• seminar

seminar

SEMINAR

Abstract:

Software models is one way of bridging the gap between the code and intentions behind a system. Over the years there has been a number of different modelling languages and frameworks for using them. One such language is Executable and Translatable UML (xtUML) which is one way of enabling a framework called Model-Driven Architecture (MDA). A core concept within MDA and xtUML is model transformations. This seminar will show how model transformations can be used for Natural Language Generation as a means for model validation.

Date: 2011-09-22 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L308, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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SEMINAR

A dry run of three talks to be presented at the SemDial workshop in Los Angeles.

http://projects.ict.usc.edu/nld/semdial2011/

1. Kristina Lundholm Fors & Jessica Villing: "Reducing cognitive load in in-vehicle dialogue system interaction"

Abstract:

In-vehicle dialogue systems need to be able to adapt to the cognitive load of the user, and, when possible, reduce cognitive load. To accomplish this, we need to know how humans act while driving and talking to a passenger, and find out if there are dialogue strategies that can be used to minimize cognitive load. In this study, we have analyzed human-human in-vehicle dialogues, focusing on pauses and adjacency pairs. Our results show that when the driver is experiencing high cognitive load, the passenger’s median pause times increase. We also found that, when switching to another domain and/or topic, both driver and passenger try to avoid interrupting an adjacency pair. This suggests that a dialogue system could help lower the user’s cognitive load by in- creasing pause lengths within turns, and plan system utterances in order to avoid switching task within an adjacency pair.

2. Ellen Breitholz & Robin Cooper: "Enthymemes as Rhetorical Resources"

Abstract:

In this paper we propose that Aristotelian enthymemes play a role in the resources available to dialogue participants.  We take as our point of departure the idea that every individual has a set of linguistic resources that are formed and reformed through interaction with other individuals and context.

We regard enthymemes as dependent record types, functions which map contexts modelled as records, corresponding to the premises of the enthymeme, to a record type which models a proposition corresponding to the conclusion of the enthymeme. The advantage of using record types is that they give us semantic objects corresponding to enthymemes (as opposed to textual objects such as inference rules) and a straightforward way of generalizing, restricting and combining enthymemes thereby giving a theory of how agents can expand and reform their rhetorical resources on the basis of experience. In this paper we propose that Aristotelian enthymemes play a role in the resources available to dialogue participants.  We take as our point of departure the idea that every individual has a set of linguistic resources that are formed and reformed through interaction with other individuals and context.
 
We regard enthymemes as dependent record types, functions which map contexts modelled as records, corresponding to the premises of the enthymeme, to a record type which models a proposition corresponding to the conclusion of the enthymeme. The advantage of using record types is that they give us semantic objects corresponding to enthymemes (as opposed to textual objects such as inference rules) and a straightforward way of generalizing, restricting and combining enthymemes thereby giving a theory of how agents can expand and reform their rhetorical resources on the basis of experience.

3. Robin Cooper and Jonathan Ginzburg: "Negation in Dialogue"

Abstract:

We consider the nature of negation in dialogue as revealed by semantic phenomena such as negative dialogue particles, psycholinguistic experimentation, and dialogue corpora. We examine alternative accounts of negation that can be used in TTR (Type Theory with Records), and conclude that an alternatives-based account which relates to the psychological notion of negation in simulation semantics is most appropriate. We show how this account relates to questions under discussion, dialogical relevance, and metalinguistic negation.

Date: 2011-09-15 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L308, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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SEMINAR

Hans Leiß (LMU, München)

Abstract:
A type reconstruction algorithm for a fragment of natural language is presented, based on Hindley's algorithm for simple types plus structural subtyping and overloading of constants. We extend Montague's PTQ-fragment of English by plural noun phrases (which may have several types) and overloaded verbs to allow for distributed and non-distributed readings of noun phrases and verb arguments. We demonstrate how type reconstruction can select suitable meanings of subject noun phrases depending on the meaning of verb phrases, thereby handling some violations of Frege's compositionality principle.

http://www.cis.uni-muenchen.de/~leiss/

Date: 2011-09-08 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L308, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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SEMINAR

Date: 2011-08-25 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L308, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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SEMINAR

During a 7.5hp project I've been working on a pilot project, evaluating and extending the existing GF grammar for Swedish. By using a large lexicon ported from SALDO and an extra GF module we hope to eventually implement a substantial parser for Swedish. This should be able to parse all of Talbanken, a treebank consisting of over 6000 sentences.

In the course of the project, grammatical constructs have been added to the GF grammar, and some improvements have been made to the lexicon. Also, an interactive tool for lexicon acquisition of Swedish verbs has been implemented, which builds GF lexicons by guessing the inflection paradigm for a given word. I will continue the work in my Master Project, and at the presentation I will discuss my results and the directions for future work that have been identified.

Date: 2011-06-09 13:00 - 14:00

Location: Room 6128 (ED house 6th floor), Chalmers

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SEMINAR

Broadly speaking, "genre" is a classification concept. A genre is a recurring and recognized pattern of communication that has a specific name. The web hosts many recognised genres, such as FAQs, press releases, product descriptions, instructions, guides, e-magazines, blogs, professional profiles, how-tos, web ads and reviews. Each of these genres serves a number of communicative and social purposes and carries additional contextual information that helps the reader interpret the content. Can web genres be identified and detected automatically? Which computational models have been tried out so far in automatic genre identification research? How well do they perform? In this talk, I will present and discuss the latest findings in automatic genre identification and suggest viable future directions.

Web:

Academic: http://sites.google.com/site/marinasantiniacademicsite/

Artificial Solutions: http://www.artificial-solutions.com/

Date: 2011-06-16 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L308, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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SEMINAR

Dale Miller (INRIA Saclay and LIX/Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France)
will give a two-part seminar about Lambda Prolog (the language which influenced the development of the logical aspects in the latest version of GF).

Abstract:

Lambda Prolog is a logic programming language based on an intuitionistic fragment of Church's Simple Theory of Types.  Such a strong logical foundations provides lambda Prolog with logically supported notions of modular programming, abstract datatypes, higher-order programming, and the lambda-tree syntax approach to the treatment of bound variables.

This seminar will provide the sequent calculus foundations of logic programming, an overview of higher-order unification, and several examples of lambda Prolog programming tasks, taken from topics such as theorem proving, operational semantics, program transformations, and the pi-calculus.

Web:

Dale Miller: http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/Labo/Dale.Miller/

lambda prolog: http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/~dale/lProlog/

Date: 2011-05-24 10:00 - 12:00

Location: EDIT room (3320), Chalmers

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SEMINAR

Dale Miller (INRIA Saclay and LIX/Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France)
will give a two-part seminar about Lambda Prolog (the language which influenced the development of the logical aspects in the latest version of GF).

Abstract:

Lambda Prolog is a logic programming language based on an intuitionistic fragment of Church's Simple Theory of Types.  Such a strong logical foundations provides lambda Prolog with logically supported notions of modular programming, abstract datatypes, higher-order programming, and the lambda-tree syntax approach to the treatment of bound variables.

This seminar will provide the sequent calculus foundations of logic programming, an overview of higher-order unification, and several examples of lambda Prolog programming tasks, taken from topics such as theorem proving, operational semantics, program transformations, and the pi-calculus.

Web:

Dale Miller: http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/Labo/Dale.Miller/

lambda prolog: http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/~dale/lProlog/

Date: 2011-05-23 10:00 - 12:00

Location: EDIT room (3320), Chalmers

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SEMINAR


Since Whorf (1936), many linguists have tried their hand at corralling the restrictions on the formation of "reversative" un-verbs; cf. e.g. Marchand (1969), Dowty (1979), Horn (1988), Clark et al. (1995). Why can you unwrap a sandwich but not unrecognize its contents or unremember to toss it in the trash? Why can a snake uncoil while a painting can't unhang?  If unfreeze is the opposite of freeze, why is unthaw a synonym of thaw?

The standard approach to the constraints on un-verb formation invokes Whorf's CRYPTOTYPE -- a covert category encompassing transitive verbs of covering and enclosing that rules out a wide range of possible bases and outputs of the relevant rule. Pullum (1999), for example, reckons that there are "about a dozen verbs" that allow un-prefixation, citing undo (a good deed) and unknow as examples of formations we know "intuitively" are impossible. Clark et al. (1995) exclude unbury and unbend, while Kemmerer & Wright (2002) rule out unboil and undecorate. Yet many of the verbs depicted in the literature as impossible, non-occurring, or -- as in Whorf's label for unsay and unmake -- "semi-archaic" are readily attested, even when the actions they denote may be physically irreversible.

While the Pullum/Whorf view may be extended to predict the pleonastic interpretation of source-oriented reversatives in Swedish, French, and English (unloosen, unthaw), it incorrectly limits the productivity of un-verb formation by conflating the SEMANTIC (aspectual) restrictions with the PRAGMATIC conditions on the way the world (normally) works; verbs like unsay, unknow, unboil, and unhappen are motivated precisely by the need to describe those (typically counterfactual) situations in which the tape of reality is reversed.

The pragmatic nature of the restrictions on un-verb formation is supported by a survey of contexts that favor the emergence of innovative un-verbs: advances in science and technology (as in the unerase and undelete commands, the unfriend or unlike verbs of social networking, or the unfuck program to reverse software protection), science fiction (as in time-travel scenarios), advertising copy (as in KFC's current unthink campaign), and the imagination of poets from Shakespeare (whose "un-king’d" Richard II is the unchallenged monarch of this realm) to pop songsters ("How can I unlove you?", "Un-break my heart"), whether the implausibility of a given reversal is conceded, mourned, or overridden.

Larry Horn (Yale University)

Date: 2011-05-19 13:15 - 15:00

Location: L308

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SEMINAR


Jeffrey Parrott (LANCHART, Copenhagen)

http://lanchart.hum.ku.dk/staff_scan/medarbejderdetaljer/?id=340729&f=1

http://spraakbanken.gu.se/nclav

Date: 2011-03-15 10:15 - 12:00

Location: L307, Lennart Torstenssonsgatan 8

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